Mongolian History

Ilkhanate

Ilkhanate

Ilkhanate

The Ilkhanate was one of the four khanates that was formed in 1256 by the Hulegu general, son of Tolui and grandson of Genghis khan. it was based, originally, on Genghis Khan’s campaigns in the Khwarezmid Empire in 1219–1224.

In its fullest extent, the state expanded into Persia which today comprise most of Iran, Iraq, Turkmenistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and East part of Rum (Asia Minor), as well western Afghanistan and southwestern Pakistan.

The emergence of Ilkhanate had an important impact in this region. The Mongol Empire had significantly eased trade and commerce across Asia. The communications between Ilkhanate and the Yuan Dynasty headquartered in China encouraged this development.

Hulegu died in 1265, and was succeeded by his son, Abaqa Khan. Towards the end of the 13th century, the rulers of the Khanate converted to Islam, though they fluctuated between the Sunni and Shia sects. Abu Sa’id Bahadur Khan, the last ruler of the Ilkhanate, died in 1335 without leaving an heir. As a result, the unity of the khanate was broken, and various princes ruled over its former territories until 1353.